Follow Friday: Shypple

I’ve written extensively lately about blockchain, and for good reason.

What if you are ready to digitize your freight and logistics needs, but aren’t ready to invest in this newly explored frontier?

Digital Shipping Solutions

Our lives have been transformed by convenient technology, from hailing a cab to having razors delivered monthly to our doorstep. And with so many options within a service industry, comparing prices has also become significantly easier.

But that technology only recently came to the logistics industry. Why?

Shypple: Booking.com for Freight and Shipping Solutions

You’re tired of keeping track of all the papers on your desk or in your file cabinet. In can be days before you have all the information you need to make a final decision about how you will move your product from point A to point B. And once your product is in transit, it takes multiple emails and phone calls to pinpoint its location.

As I learned at Intermodal Europe 2018, lack of visibility is a concern for everyone in the supply chain, yet the industry has not widely embraced solutions to this problem.

Shypple addresses these issues and more.

It’s been touted as the “Booking.com for sea freight,” and rightfully so. If users are already familiar with the concept, why not apply the model to your own industry, especially one as layered as logistics?

In response to the ancient methods of the freight industry, Shypple founder Jarell Habets started Shypple to make transportation easier. With so many options and providers in the market, this dashboard allows users to compare quotes, consolidate documents, and track shipments from one application.

Furthermore, Shypple offers financing options, insurance, and customs management. It offers the whole freight package from start to finish!

When I read about Shypple, I was surprised to learn that no service like this existed for logistics. A digital platform for planning every branch of a shipment’s journey seems like an obvious need. (Again, how is there such a lack of visibility?) But as I have come to learn, the industry has not been quick to evolve.

How does Shypple improve the shipping industry?

With Shypple, customers can make responsible, fully informed decisions in less time, saving their companies valuable resources. But how does it pressure the logistics industry to change?

On one hand, this type of ranked comparison makes it easier for customers to choose the cheapest – but not necessarily highest quality – option. This may further encourage the “race to the bottom,” which is something that many agree is not good for the industry.

On the other hand, it may pressure the supply chain to improve in other ways in order to be competitive. How does your company fair when compared side-by-side to your competitors in a platform that allows customers to book in one click? What do you have to offer customers other than a low price?

Final Thoughts

I’m still an advocate for blockchain technology in the logistics industry. Those who had the resources to invest in trials and research should absolutely do so.

But Shypple solves a different problem for users on the supply chain. Shypple is for the one who initiates the chain but the last link on the line. It makes building the chain simpler and more visible. And the industry could use more visibility.


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Intermodal Europe 2018: What I Learned

I learned about Intermodal Europe 2018 while scrolling through my LinkedIn newsfeed. It was two days way – I knew I had to register!

I was only able to make it to one of three days of the conference, but I thoroughly enjoyed the the panels I attended. As someone who doesn’t currently work in the industry but wants to serve the industry, it was quite enlightening.

Intermodal Europe 2018 Review

Change Is Coming to the Logistics Industry (or at least it should be)

I constantly heard that one of the main factors slowing progress is the resistance to technology and change.

Today, we can download an app to hail a cab and watch it approach our location, while also turning the heat on before we arrive and ordering food to be delivered to our home. In contrast, logistics companies can’t tell a customer where their shipment is or how it disappeared.

One speaker noted that one of the highlights of last year’s conference was a type of tracker that goes inside the shipping container. That was 2017.

Why hasn’t the industry progressed? Why does the supply chain seem to encounter the same problems it did 100 years ago?

The resistance to technology is not just a change of inertia – it’s also a fear of job losses. People are constantly afraid that artificial intelligence will replace them, rather than approaching it as a tool.

And this resistance to technology has ripple effects. The Women in Logistics panel highlighted not only the absence of women in the industry, but the absence of any interest from the upcoming workforce. Logistics and supply chain has not proven itself to be a forward-thinking industry compared to other fields currently embracing the unknown technological frontier.

While there is some innovation is coming from within the industry, other fields are also developing solutions for the inefficiencies of logistics.

Digital Platforms: Baby Steps into the 21st Century

I still find it shocking that the logistics industry hasn’t, as a whole, made the shift to digital platforms. How does anyone trust that their items will get from point A to B? How is anyone held accountable? How do companies stay competitive if they don’t have a user-friendly interface or website? Who has the time?

Companies like FreightBro offer great solutions for customers and freight forwarders to reduce their paper use, communication delays, and time spent connecting the dots. By centralizing all their freight operations in one application, companies and customers  waste less time searching for solutions and create a better workflow.

But while digital platforms may help streamline administration, they do not address all the challenges facing the logistics industry.

Blockchain: Take the Plunge

Another universal sentiment seemed to be the need for collaboration. No one functions alone as part of the supply chain.

Dr. Rolf Neise echoed an idea that the Blocklab white paper also suggested: players in the logistics industry need to specialize or focus on what they do best.

Being really good at administrative tasks isn’t enough. Shouldn’t everyone be able to file paperwork correctly and communicate efficiently? By specializing in a field or aspect of the supply chain, a company can secure its position in the industry and prove its value as a partner.

Nico Wauters from T-Mining, Tom van Dijk from CGI, and Clinton Senkow from ShipChain were all passionate advocates for using blockchain to improve the supply chain. By implementing its technology, companies can shift their focus from “fire fighting” to providing premium customer service.

Currently, blockchain trials are being conducted in small, private networks. If (and when) the technology takes off and becomes commonplace in the industry, transactions and payments will be visible to everyone on the blockchain.

Building Trust within the Logistics Industry

Change isn’t easy for everyone. Blockchain is not only a change in a company’s workflow, but also its mindset. You have to trust others in the industry that they will make good choices, too.

Van Dijk said that blockchain is disruptive by creating a layer of trust between points on the supply chain. It seems like such a strange definition of “disruption,” but with the lack of visibility in the industry – another universal complaint – it’s easy to see how that trust between partners is not easily earned.

Sharing is Caring

As part of trust-building, some people call for data sharing. It feels risky – why would anyone want their competitors to know how well they move product?

Currently, everyone operates based on the information they are given and the data they produce. This, however, is an incomplete picture of the supply chain.

Thomas Bibette demonstrated how DCBrain is helping companies put their own data to practical use. But with more data available, new trends may reveal themselves, which may lead to better solutions, which may lead to less churn for you.

Without sharing data, it will be increasingly difficult to pin-point issues in the industry so that everyone can improve. Remember: no one functions alone in the supply chain. (At least, if you don’t want giants like Amazon and Alibaba putting you out of business.)

How to Get Decision Makers on Board

It’s the million-dollar question. From what I saw, it seems that many leaders in the industry are focused on making today’s sale, or on the number of shipping containers lost last week. It’s hard to plan for the future when there’s a fire that needs to be put out today.

As step one of his value-based 5-step method, van Dijk suggests starting with creating awareness among key stakeholders before experimenting and creating a pilot.

But how do we create awareness that will change the mindset of this ancient industry?

Maybe start with a few examples of how blockchain has proven its positive impact on the supply chain. The ports of Antwerp and Rotterdam have shown interest in it. Companies like Walmart have experimented with shipping lettuce using the technology, and IBM and Maersk developed a blockchain partnership:

Through better visibility and more efficient means of communicating, some supply chain participants estimate they could reduce the steps taken to answer basic operational questions such as “where is my container” from 10 steps and five people to, with TradeLens, one step and one person.

One step with one person. The efficiency is almost unimaginable. Why would your company want to be left behind in this technological advancement?

These, however, are industry powerhouses. They have the resources to invest in this type of research and experimentation. The blockchain infrastructure doesn’t fully exist yet – it is still only comprised of private networks.

But even so, ShipChain is running pilot programs with Perdue and CaseStack, and has had its work recognized in the DHL white paper on blockchain and logistics. While these names, again, are heavy hitters, the growing investment and interest in the technology cannot be ignored.

As Senkow said, this is just the “dial-up” stage of blockchain. It has so much potential and there’s no denying that it will be here to stay.

Final Thoughts

At the moment, it seems that offering services at the lowest cost is everyone’s priority. With giants like Amazon and Walmart offering free shipping, it’s no wonder people expect low costs, regardless of quality of service.

But that just can’t be the case.

At the moment, clients may be willing to pay a low price for the risk of the item getting lost. But if you could guarantee that their product could be tracked all the way from point A to B with your stellar customer service, wouldn’t that be worth the risk of investment?

And, as I mentioned before, the future of logistics is also dependent on the type of talent that the industry attracts. Don’t you want the best and the brightest? Because as the logistics industry strands, it’s not looking very attractive.

Logistics is the backbone of the global economy. Why isn’t it a leader in advancement?


Interested in nerding out about supply chain logistics? Talk to me!

Bamboo Juice and the FDA: Are the Hazards of Fresh Juice Real?

Food Safety News reported that the juice company Bamboo Juice received quite the scolding from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Included in their strongly worded letter was a list of violations, such as:

  • misbranded food (calling a juice “spinach apple” when it also includes other ingredients)
  • unapproved new drugs (claiming a juice is an “inflammation tamer” or is a “natural remedy for kicking colds and clearing sinuses”)
  • inadequate 5-log reduction plan (not enough steps taken to eliminate microbial hazards)

While the first two are more about phrasing choices, the last item may cause harm to consumers. A 5-log reduction plan should be included in the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan, which is a collection of procedures that the business implements in order to prevent outbreaks of food illnesses.

While it was initially required for seafood and meat manufacturers, HACCP plans are now a requirement for almost every aspect of the food manufacturing industry. So what does that mean for juice?

HACCP and Pasteurization

When I worked for a different Georgia juice company, one of my first tasks was to create the HACCP plan.

In addition to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and Sanitary Standard Operating Procedures (SSOPs), the 5-Log Reduction is a major component of food illness prevention. For those who are not food safety or math savvy, a 5-Log Reduction refers to what steps the business takes to reduce the number of microorganisms (read: bad bacteria) in their final product.

Until recently, that usually meant pasteurization, which is the process of heating up the product in order to kill bad bacteria. As a result, however, the flavor may change and some of the nutritional value may decrease.

HACCP and Pasteurization

 

But with high pressure pasteurization (HPP), the bad bacteria is eliminated through a cold pressure process, therefore preserving the nutrients and flavor while still eliminating the bad bacteria.

But there are many who believe that pasteurization isn’t entirely necessary. Think about it: do you wash your apple in water that’s 160° F for six seconds before eating it? If you juiced that apple instead, why would you heat it up to that same temperature for that same time period?

This example, of course, is not to scale. Juice companies receive huge quantities of produce from a variety of suppliers. It is, however, something to consider when you read about the dangers of drinking fresh juice.

Overall, pasteurizing juice is one of the best and most common ways to prevent food borne illnesses – a “better safe than sorry” situation. Its primary purpose is to prevent the highest risk microorganism, which in most cases is E. coli, clostridium botulinum (botulism), and salmonella.

But there are other steps businesses can (and do) take to prevent the occurrence of bad bacteria: properly washing the produce, culling for “bad apples,” and having good relationships with produce suppliers. That trust of sources can be crucial.

With the establishment of GMPs and SSOPs, some juice companies have two lines of juice:

  • A fresh juice line, which is only sold directly to customers in retail locations
  • A pasteurized juice line, which is only sold to consumers via a retailer such as Whole Foods, Publix, and other local markets

By having two product lines, a juice company can increase its business while also staying true to their mission of spreading good health.

Bamboo Juice and the FDA

According to this letter from the FDA, it seems that Bamboo Juice may not have two separate product lines, even though they sell juice both directly to consumers as well as through third parties.

The letter specifically states:

while your plan includes three critical control points as processing, bottling and cooler packaging and delivery temperatures, none of the critical control points identify and/or include a microbial reduction step. In addition, your “5-log reduction program”, attached to your HACCP plan, indicates the juice is not subject to any treatment that would ensure a 5 log reduction and is therefore not a suitable process to comply with the minimum 5 log reduction requirement for any of your juices.

While there are no details as to what “processing” includes, I read this statement as saying “you’re not pasteurizing your juices to prevent microbial growth.”

Bamboo Juices has made a commitment to not pasteurizing in order to preserve their products’ nutrients. This means, however, that they are not permitted to sell their juices to third party retailers.

Final Thoughts

I do not know whether Bamboo Juice has considered HPP as an alternative to traditional pasteurization. Because HPP is a newer technology, the financial barrier to access it is high – possibly higher than Bamboo Juice is willing to invest.

Hopefully, however, Bamboo Juice will find a way to meet FDA requirements while still producing the healthiest juice they can.


I love to simplify concepts so that customers can make informed decisions. Need help with that? Let’s talk.

Follow Friday: Blocklab

In case you hadn’t noticed, I really enjoying writing about supply chain management. It’s a field that I didn’t know existed until I started working, and ever since, I’ve been interested in learning more about how goods move around the world.

Supply chain logistics affect everyone, from the raw material production to the end consumer. A single wrinkle in the chain can be disruptive to industries around the world. But as the industry’s inefficiencies have become an accepted evil, the world has allowed those wrinkles to accumulate.

But what if it didn’t have to be that way? What if we could eliminate the redundancies and errors and unnecessary delays in the process of moving something from point A to point B?

Ironing out those wrinkles and making clients happy with a smooth shipping experience is one of the reasons I came to Rotterdam: to find the perfect logistics company.

Rotterdam is Europe’s largest port, making the metropolitan area a global logistics capital. With over 2000 companies providing service in some form to the industry, it would seem that innovation here is constantly shaping and re-shaping the supply chain world.

That is, in fact, not the case.

Rotterdam has only stepped up its game on the international stage within the past ten years. The city has invested in a variety of projects in order to attract talent and persuade businesses to establish a presence. One such project is Blocklab.

Blocklab

About Blocklab

Blocklab wrote a great whitepaper explaining how blockchain can (and will) streamline the logistics industry. It’s thorough but easy to read. In addition to its overview of how blockchain can improve operations and finances, the paper also touches on the environmental impact of making the industry more efficient. (Spoiler alert: it’s a good impact.)

A point that is elegantly touched on is the idea that blockchain may level the playing field for all companies involved:

Careful analysis of successful applications in supply chain management shows that they are based on managing the supply chain as a single entity as a result of one dominant member being able to impose his will on the others. However decentralized supply chains do not have such a dominant member and as a result the potential benefits of supply chain management have so far been much more difficult to realize in these systems. However, using smart contracts in combination with new advanced planning algorithms the (dis)benefits could be fairly distributed among the supply chain members based on actual and immutable transactions.

While any single player may dominate the supply chain process, blockchain will decentralize that power. As a result, SMEs may have a greater opportunity to thrive by emphasizing the value they add to the customer’s experience, rather than the price tag:

Picking up a container, unloading a truck in a CFS, stuffing an export container, sending an invoice to a client, booking an incoming invoice, custom clearance; hardly stuff to get excited about. Your next door competitor does exactly the same and the only way you can differentiate yourself is by being cheaper. The end result: ‘a race to the bottom’. What if we would develop a shared system for all these kind of ‘non-unique selling point’ type of activities? One in which all trust issues are resolved and automated? One in which all processes have been redesigned, made simpler or even totally obliterated? This would significantly lower the transaction costs in and around the port of Rotterdam, making it more competitive – increasing volumes and efficiency and allowing LSPs to compete on value – added, not on price.

This is the kind of talk that gets me excited about supply chain management.

Blocklab’s Blockchain Solutions for Rotterdam

Blocklab has developed solutions for the Port of Rotterdam to increase efficiency through the application of blockchain technology. Its application, however, is easier said than done.

This adoption of Blocklab’s pilot program will shake up all aspects of logistics, from operation to finances to tracking, and everything in between. By implementing blockchain technology, these processes will – ideally – become significantly more efficient and therefore cost effective.

A transaction to move product from point A to point B involves dozens of interactions. According to the Port of Rotterdam’s CFO Paul Smits, a shipment from China to Rotterdam can involve up to 28 parties. With the implementation of blockchain technology, that transaction can move seamlessly through those companies with digital documentation, immediate approval of transactions, and fewer delays.

Final Thoughts

Previously I have questioned the plausibility of the entire supply chain adopting the technology. If not everyone agrees to be so transparent, how effective can the application of blockchain be?

And taking it a step further: if the platform doesn’t offer an all-in-one solution, how agreeable will businesses be to adopt it?

If, however, the largest port of Europe chooses to implement it, it may be in everyone’s interest to accept blockchain technology as part of their futures. I look forward to seeing how Blocklab’s project with the Port of Rotterdam unfolds.


Change (and growth) is inevitable and often times difficult. I can make it easier for you. Let’s talk about it.

How does blockchain technology help the food industry?

Blockchain, blockchain, blockchain. It’s all anyone wants to talk about (including myself, to some extent).

In just the past week, people have sent me two articles about blockchain and the food industry: The Next Web wrote about Australia recently shipping almonds to Germany with blockchain technology, and Forbes wrote about some of the major players working to implement blockchain technology in the food manufacturing industry.

Clearly businesses see potential benefits from using blockchain technology – but what are they?

Blockchain Technology and the Food Industry

Cut Red Tape, Reduce Waste, and Eliminate Wasteful Bureaucracy

One of the benefits frequently highlighted is the reduction in bureaucratic waste. By replacing paperwork and verification steps with blockchain technology, businesses can reduce costs and save time.

The assumption is that everyone in the supply chain uses the same blockchain software, let alone using it at all.

These articles talk about huge companies that have the resources to do trial runs, which is great for those who can’t afford to test the waters. But everyone involved in the experiment is testing the same software.

I realize that may seem like an obvious statement and necessary for product development, but with the way “blockchain” is so freely used, articles make it sound universally accessible, rather than a new technology.

As far as I’ve seen, companies like IBM and Microsoft are developing solutions, which means it’s unlikely they’ll speak to each other. Why would one business want to be compatible with another business’s software for the same purpose?

It’s the same dilemma that the medical industry faced with digitizing medical records. Sure, it technically eliminated the need for fax machines, but because none of the solutions speak to each other, hospitals and medical offices are still using fax machines. (For more about this, listen to Vox’s The Impact.)

Blockchain_Med-01

E. Coli, Salmonella, and Other Scary Words That Make Your Stomach Crawl

Another the common example of application is that of foodborne illnesses. If there’s an E. Coli outbreak, officials will be able to trace the source in a matter of seconds and identify where the problem originated.

For example, take the romaine lettuce E. Coli outbreak in the United States in spring 2018. Illnesses were reported at the end of March, and an official statement was released by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) on April 10.

Between April 18 and May 16, the CDC suspected that the contaminated lettuce came from the Yuma region and continued to investigate.

On May 16, they released a statement to say that all contaminated lettuce from the Yuma region was last harvested on April 16.

In this instance, blockchain technology could have potentially stopped the contaminated harvesting sooner. Instead of receiving enough evidence after the last harvest date, the CDC could have found that information sooner with the near-immediate retrieval of information that blockchain technology provides.

But where do we lag the most in food illness outbreaks? Is the time businesses spend trying to determine where a shipment came from? Or is it more about the resources available to the CDC and the constraints of simply being human?

The first reported illness from this outbreak was on March 22 – 19 days before the outbreak was officially declared. And even when the CDC released their official statement on April 10, they were not sure of the cause. Romaine lettuce is not pegged as the culprit until April 13.

Collecting data to prove an outbreak takes time and is not necessarily something that can be resolved by blockchain. Take it one step further – can blockchain even help prevent the outbreak from happening in the first place?

Final Thoughts

Overall, I’m excited about blockchain technology. I still love seeing all the new trials and applications of it. I’m just hesitant to put all my eggs in this trustless basket for now.